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Virtual VISION offers ongoing professional development with post-event access

ACTE’s CareerTech Virtual VISION 2020 featured live keynote presentations and hundreds of sessions, covering CTE innovations, timely topics and specific CTE subject-matter areas.

Gain full post-event access to Virtual VISION.

Conference materials and sessions are now available for 24/7 on-demand viewing at your convenience at regular attendee rates. Enjoy premier professional development via full access to all Virtual VISION sessions! Register for full access.

Achieve 100 Award recognizes institutional commitment to CTE

Showcase your institution’s dedication and commitment to career and technical education!

Achieve 100 Award deadline approaches

Schools and institutions that have achieved 100% ACTE membership across their CTE staff and faculty will receive this distinguished award. All faculty members must be active ACTE members as of Dec. 30.

Fill out the online application by Feb. 1 to participate and recognize your educators!

NEWS: Oklahoma CTE students selected as finalists in NASA’s App Development Challenge

Moore Norman Technology Center‘s programming & software development program was selected to attend a two-day virtual event experience, culminating NASA’s App Development Challenge (ADC).Teams will present their apps to NASA leadership during the event. And participants will have the chance to meet with industry leaders.

MNTC team members include seniors from Norman High School (NHS), Norman North High School (NNHS) and Moore High School (MHS):

  • Katrina Ashpaugh, NHS
  • Travis Bode, NNHS
  • Dylan Decoster, MHS
  • Julian Lautzenheiser, NNHS
  • Lauren Smith, MHS
  • Christian Zacher, NNHS

Oklahoma software development students selected by NASA for unique approach to wayfinding.

The NASA review team said MNTC’s app has a unique approach to the wayfinding visualization and in the illumination feature. They also appreciated the extra effort for accessibility for those with color blindness when using color data sets within the app. Additionally, NASA applauded Moore Norman’s work with online coding communities for beta testing and community outreach for app improvements.

Culminating event teams selected include:

  • Academies of Loudoun, Leesburg, Virginia
  • Bell Creek Academy High School, Riverview, Florida
  • Bishop O’Connell High School, Arlington, Virginia
  • Falcon Cove Middle School, Weston, Florida
  • McNeil High School, Austin, Texas
  • Middlesex County Academy, Edison, New Jersey
  • Moon Millers: Millburn High School, Millburn, New Jersey
  • Moore Norman Technology Center, Norman, Oklahoma
  • Team Equinox: Gilman School, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Whitney High School, Cerritos, California

What is the App Development Challenge?

NASA presents technical problems to middle and high school students, seeking contributions for future exploration missions. According to NASA STEM, “Students take part in the Artemis Generation endeavors to land American astronauts, including the first woman and the next man, on the Moon by 2024.

NASA Technical Advisor Dr. Bryan Welch said, “The capabilities and the apps varied across the teams. Every team brought a unique aspect to their app that we found to be creative, intuitive and useful. Myself, and several of my reviewers found it inspiring.

ADC engages students in CTE through real-world application.

For this particular ADC, students worked to develop an app that visualizes the South Pole region of the moon. It was developed in collaboration with NASA’s Space Communications and Navigation (NASA SCAM) team.

NASA Education Specialist Jamie Semple said, “The SCAM team needed an app that will visualize the moon’s surface for future mission planning and training activities and must also contain a path for exploration and identify communication checkpoint links.”

Students from across the U.S. began work on their apps on Sept. 30 and submitted solution videos online by Nov. 18. And NASA may use one of their apps in the future.

MNTC Programming & Software Development Instructor Rachel Hurt said, “I am always in awe of what my students achieve when they pull together and work to succeed. As our group finished their interview with NASA’s leadership team, I knew that our work helping them sharpen their programming and soft skills was paying off.

“These high school seniors took the knowledge of programming they’ve learned and used it in a real-life scenario. I am extremely proud of these students, and I am extremely proud to be part of an organization that does so much to promote student success.”

“Our team felt honored and proud to be selected as one of the finalists for the NASA ADC,” said Lauren Smith, app team spokesperson. “The obstacles we faced being virtual this year granted us some unique opportunities to hone our skills in self-discipline, team communication and working in a virtual environment.”

Learn more about the NASA App Development Challenge.

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A dream realized: In celebration of Techniques turning 25

A dream began in 1999 when I took a job at Clinton Technical School in Clinton, Missouri. I became a career and technical education (CTE) teacher in the same building where I was once a CTE student.

As a student, I studied business law and accounting, becoming a state competitor in FBLA as a senior in 1993. Just six years later, in 1999, I took a marketing education position down the hallway. Later, I worked as a teacher and administrator at the Career and Technology Center in Fort Osage, Missouri. And, since 2011, I have served as director of Northland Career Center in Platte City, Missouri.

In each of these amazing places, CTE provided me with a purpose in my career. It has been my calling, to watch students learn and grow while finding their pathways into the real world.

Over these past 22 years, I have maintained a passion for learning and innovation. And my most trusted sources for CTE-specific professional development have been the Association of Career and Technical Education (ACTE) and Techniques magazine. I have had the privilege of being a Missouri ACTE member, an ACTE member, and a subscriber of my favorite professional magazine, Techniques, for all 22 years of my career.

Techniques is valuable.   

I commend ACTE for its work with the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) and Advance CTE. By attending ACTE national conferences and reading Techniques, I learned about SREB’s Technology Centers that Work (TCTW) initiative and Advance CTE’s career clusters. Techniques and ACTE provide members like me with meaningful and relevant articles that ignite effective instruction and school improvement.

As Techniques turns 25 in 2021, I celebrate the impact this publication has had on my career and on the careers of many of my colleagues. In each of my roles in CTE, I have turned to Techniques for a variety of reasons.Consistently, I knew I could find inspiration and innovation in facilitating CTE instruction and leadership. 

Techniques is versatile.

The versatility of Techniques for CTE educators is unmatched. Innovative instruction, CTE funding, marketing, work-based learning, experiential learning, career pathway development, and leadership. These are only some of the many concepts that educators can read about in print or on the digital site. 

Techniques offers additional benefits in my life, outside the classroom. Additionally, Techniques has helped expand my knowledge of career pathways available for my children, who possess very different skill sets and interests.

In my own educational advancement, I have resourced many Techniques articles in written work. In fact, in a paper I wrote during the final stages of my Education Specialist degree, I cited 19 articles from various issues of Techniques, including from my favorite issue of all time — Changing the Image of CTE (2011).I also have recommended issues for other CTE educators pursuing their own research. Techniques is NCC’s go-to publication when seeking stories of CTE success from across the country.

Techniques turns 25.

Along with all of my personal and professional appreciations for Techniques, it is important to note the broader impact: Techniques turning 25 aligns with a rebirth of CTE. Techniques has helped guide the shift to a whole new world of CTE in 2021. CTE is now having its moment in the spotlight, and Techniques has been a catalyst in changing its image. 

Amid these exciting times for CTE, this anniversary year for Techniques happens to occur during a unique time in our society. This past fall, Northland Career Center celebrated 40 years. And we celebrated as best as we could during a pandemic, showcasing the past, present and future of our organization.

Best wishes to Techniques as they celebrate an anniversary during these unusual times. The past offers history and tradition. The present offers insight and direction, and the future offers an important connection to tomorrow for CTE educators. Cheers to the next 25 years, Techniques!

Brian Noller is director of Northland Career Center. Prior to this role, he served as a marketing teacher and DECA adviser at Clinton Public Schools & Fort Osage School District, also as assistant director and summer school director at Fort Osage Career & Technology Center. Noller has dedicated a commitment to CTE. He is married to Anita Noller and together they have two children, Camden (11) and Delayna (8). Email or reach out on Twitter.

Driving the next generation in trucking

The United States is facing a crisis in its supply chain. At a time when Americans are relying on quick and efficient delivery more than ever, our nation’s already struggling transportation system experiences even greater strain. More than 70% of freight in the U.S. travels by truck (Costello, 2019). And this problem threatens to slow our supply chain to a crawl. ATA Chief Economist Bob Costello said the industry will need to hire 1 million new drivers over the next 10 years.

Explore careers in trucking.

Careers in trucking present a unique opportunity for young people to enter the skilled workforce. According to Bruce Evans, executive vice president of talent analytics at Emsi, which provides labor market data to professional who specialize in workforce development, truck driver is the most posted job in the U.S.

Those who wish to obtain a commercial driver’s license (CDL) must be 18 years old and must also pass an exam. Most people do this by attending a CDL course (lasting four to six weeks) at their local technical community college or a driving school.

The newly formed Next Generation in Trucking Association establishes high school programs to meet this huge need.

Only six high schools in the U.S. offer CDL driver programs. One of those can be found at Patterson High School in Patterson, California. The program, which was created in 2016 by teacher and former truck driver Dave Dein, has grown steadily over the last four years. Dein helped create Next Gen Trucking, which provides turn-key curriculum and partnerships for free and discounted resources. Next Gen also helps foster key partnerships for advisory boards and apprenticeship programs. Dein sees a true change is happening in his students.

Meet Javier

Javier was a student at Patterson High School. He had parents who loved him and a little brother that looked up to him, but he wasn’t succeeding in the traditional school programs offered to him. During his senior year, Javier learned of the CDL program. He enrolled, and he thrived.

Javier exemplifies the importance of career and technical education in high school.

And his brother? He just passed the CDL test!

Logistics

The Patterson High School program was specifically designed to meet the needs of the digital generation.

Abundant use of technology and interactive, relatable lessons solidify student engagement. PHS incorporates the use of two state-of-the-art driving simulators built by Advanced Training Systems. Here, students learn not only the basics in operating a commercial motor vehicle in a safe environment, but receiving training on how to react in emergency situations, something that cannot be replicated using a real truck.

Additionally, PHS switched from a standard textbook to leverage digital, personalized environment to teach required federal standards. Since partnering with transportation curriculum provider Instructional Technologies, Dein has seen an increase in student retention levels.

Students are trained in the proper way to perform industry-specific body movements, to prevent workplace injuries, using an online program called Worklete. Students interact through the use of real-world applications and practice movements throughout the week to create muscle memory.

The PHS program has grown from teaching the basics to providing a comprehensive overview of the trucking industry. Students explore technological and safety advances that are changing the landscape of the industry.

What’s next?

With comprehensive curriculum and a program in place, the next step for trucking is its own CTE pathway. The plan will be to begin working with students in their sophomore year, offering a basic Class C driving class with an emphasis on trucking. Juniors would learn the basic operation of a truck, involving how to shift a 10-speed transmission and proper identification of vehicle parts. As seniors, students not only elevate and perfect their skills, but would also take on a leadership role in assisting in the training of the underclassmen.

Truck driving falls under the warehousing and logistics career pathway in California. Elsewhere, relevant career pathways include heavy equipment, construction or diesel mechanics. These are all professions in which a CDL is an asset or required. Students with a CDL will be highly marketable and ready to begin an in-demand career in trucking.

CTE programs in trucking must continue to grow so that the items you depend on arrive on time. We face an obstacle with nationwide implications, and the trucking industry is ready to partner with career and technical education programs to fill a pipeline of qualified drivers. Learn more.

Lindsey Trent works for Ryder. She also serves on the board of the Kentucky Trucking Association, Fairdale High School Advisory Board and started the Next Generation in Trucking Association.  She resides in Kentucky with her husband and two kids and loves to golf, travel and read.

Dave Dein has served in public education for the last 22 years while simultaneously pursuing his passion for trucking.  He has accumulated more than 700,000 safe driving miles. Dein is also the founder of Faith Logistics, an outreach truck driving school that trained rehabilitated inmates. In his free time he enjoys long distance backpacking in search of his next adventure. Contact them.

Get Back to Basics: Strategies for Remote Learning in CTE

The transition to remote learning has left educators reeling. Being asked to design lessons, learn new technology, all while educating your own children and simultaneously trying to stay connected to family and friends in the middle of a pandemic is a herculean task. For career and technical education (CTE) teachers, the loss of balance is even further compounded. Why? Because CTE curriculum is often dependent on access to specialized tools and large machines

Imagine trying to teach woodworking without a lathe, or automotive without a lift. Imagine trying to teach biotechnology without a pipette, or HVAC without access to a soldering table.

It’s hard to picture — let alone do.

The truth is, CTE teachers can’t replicate the experience of hands-on learning in industry-specific lab spaces. What they can do is this:

Get back to basics.

CTE students learning in a remote environment can still learn something essential.

They can still learn how to learn.

After all, in the real world, CTE students must be able to acquire new knowledge. Today’s CTE students will soon be plumbers, electricians, cosmetologists, news anchors, entrepreneurs, engineers and doctors. They will all encounter novel situations that require deeper understanding and the independent discovery of answers.

The following strategies are designed to help CTE teachers develop curriculum, projects and lessons that guide students to take ownership of how they learn.

Think about the barriers.

  • Before you design a lesson plan or an activity, pause and think about what barriers students might experience as they try to learn in a remote environment. For example, some students only have one computer at home. Plan virtual “office hours” with tons of advanced notice; offer alternative options for students to connect with you.
  • If you haven’t heard from a student in a while, don’t ask why before considering the barriers. Ask yourself, “How can I design the lesson to better engage this student?” Connect with the student’s counselor for advice on outreach strategies.
  • You might also develop an assignment that asks students to think about barriers they and their peers may be experiencing. Encourage them to be as honest as possible. Waking up might be a barrier if they are constantly staying up later than they would normally due to a lack of school-based scheduling.
  • In remote learning environments many educators are leveraging video resources. If you choose to do so, make sure you don’t unintentionally create more barriers. Render all videos so they include closed captioning. That way students who are hearing impaired can access the learning. Captioning will also benefit students in noisy environments and enriches the learning experience for all.

Focus on the goal.

Student engagement may increase in remote learning environments if educators place a strong focus on making sure they are truly assessing the learning goal. For example, it might seem natural to ask students to write an essay response to the following question: Describe how you use a tool safely. But, if that is the only option you provide for students to demonstrate learning, what are you assessing really?

A student might know how to use the tool safely, but they might not be able to access a computer for writing, or they may not feel confident in their writing skills. What if you provided students with options for demonstrating their understanding? Can you still assess the learning goal of safety…

  • If the student makes a video explaining how they would use the tool?
  • If they draw a poster and submit a photograph of it?

Ask students to describe their learning goals. Consider creating an assignment that asks students to answer the following question: What are the three most important things you would like to learn with the remaining time in the school year? Use these answers to drive your unit development and activity planning.

Keep it relevant.

Students learn best when they feel the materials, tools, units or concepts are relevant or authentic. During the COVID-19 pandemic, keep it relevant by focusing on themes and tools students can access at home. Here’s an idea from Abraham Ewing, a CTE woodworking and manufacturing teacher at ConVal High School, in Peterborough, New Hampshire.

Share your home projects.

Ewing sends daily videos to students. He teaches woodworking students about estimating wood costs, project design, drawing, planning and more as he builds raised beds in his own backyard. “When I call home to talk and share what students are learning about building raised beds, most of the parents seem really excited because they want their kids to build them too.”

Ewing recommends teachers stay flexible and be ready to improvise. “For my manufacturing class I bought my own 3D printer. I use it for visuals in my class videos and I showed them how local people were using 3D printers to make masks for hospitals.”

Consider asking students what projects they are working on at home. Could students create short how-to videos detailing the projects they are working on? If they can’t work on projects at home, ask students to draw or make a video of what project they would like to do at home. How can you use students’ interests to increase engagement and make the material relevant?

If I had to craft an essential question for this time in education, it might be:

How can CTE educators design remote learning so lessons are accessible, relevant and engaging?

While the answer will look different for each teacher, and will largely depend on support, student population and subject area, the common denominator will be the need to develop strategies that bring us all back to the heart of learning.

 

Before working at CAST, Amanda Bastoni, Ed.D., was an accomplished CTE director and teacher with 20+ years of experience in K-12 educational leadership, journalism and business. She has a proven record of achievement including being named the 2019 New Hampshire CTE Leader of the Year. During her time in education, Amanda has focused on increasing equity and access for special populations in CTE. Email her.

DEAR LINDA: What is asynchronous learning in CTE?

There are many times in the life of a teacher when we are filled with fear, doubt and confusion. Literally, that would be the title of my first year as a teacher. And now, in 2020, we all feel that uncertainty renewed as we navigate a new normal in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The all new Dear Linda column on PAGES, a Techniques blog has been in planning stages since fall 2019 but there seems no better time than now to launch. Dear Linda is a space for career and technical educators, where they can feel supported and encouraged to ask questions, seek answers and uncover valuable resources, now and going forward.

Dear Linda,

My school district provided guidance that we should teach using asynchronous learning. What does that mean for a career and technical education (CTE) course? –A Teacher from Connecticut

Hello and thank you, Connecticut, for your question.

This is a great question. I, too, felt overwhelmed by the word “asynchronous” when I first heard it and so what did I do? A search! Google defines the term:

Asynchronous learning is the idea that students learn the same material at different times and locations. Asynchronous learning is also called location independent learning, and is opposite to synchronous learning where students learn at the same time by activities such as attending a lecture or laboratory.

After reading this, I took a moment and really thought about the CTE classroom; I realized that we have been asynchronous for years.

Think about your own classroom.

You provide the content through slides and demonstrations; then students are offered time to work on their skills independently. The key word there is independently. CTE students are resilient and able to adapt to a variety of situations. Why? We prepare them for the ever-changing workforce.

Now, in the midst of the current COVID-19 crisis, the only major difference is, your content will be delivered via a platform such as Google Classroom.

What exactly does asynchronous learning look like?

    • Content can be delivered (whether review or new, district depending) via Google Slides. You can use Google Meet to review the slides live or you might record them and publish in your classroom. There is value added for students as they listen to you point out the key elements of the lesson.
    • Questions can be answered during Google Meet live sessions or during virtual office hours I have also been scheduling check-in times where students can come just to talk like they used to in my brick and mortar classroom.
    • Skill videos can be uploaded from a variety of resources or if you have materials at home, you can simulate. In the video below you can see how I have modified a partial bed bath for my nurse aide students using a baby doll.
  • Attendance can be taken using a Google Form, which transfers to a Google Sheet. Another idea is to set up an expectation for “roll call” using your system’s chat feature, where students simply comment “here” when they enter. If you are doing a Google Meet, there is an add-on feature that tracks attendance automatically.

Keep in mind

Many students will benefit from the added flexibility of an asynchronous learning environment; they can enter your classroom day or night to view and complete the assignments.

Try not to stress. Keep things simple. Remind yourself as you remind your students… We are all learning together. Focus on keeping your virtual classroom environment, safe, loving and a place where your students feel comfortable coming to talk and learn. Let them always know how much you care!

Be safe and thank you again for this wonderful question.

Linda Romano

 

Send us your questions and Linda will have the answers. Questions for Dear Linda can be emailed to techniques@acteonline.org.

Linda Romano is vice president of ACTE’s Health Science Education Division and a health science/nurse aide educator for Newburgh Enlarged City School District, where she has been a CTE teacher since 2006. In 2018, Romano was named ACTE’s Teacher of the Year. She also serves as president of the New York Health Science Educator Association.

Romano is an active registered nurse and serves in several volunteer capacities for her state of New York and within the local Newburgh Community/ Newburgh Armory Unity Center. In addition to mentoring new teachers, Linda Romano developed and leads a program called Scholars in Scrubs, which provides education, health and wellness, and opportunities for young people (pre-K to high school) and their parents/grandparents.

Changing Careers, Chasing a Dream

For as long as I can remember, I have been interested in the technical aspects of things. I loved understanding how things worked and I seemed to gravitate toward engines. Although this was a primary interest of mine, everyone always told me that I couldn’t be successful in that field; I was led to believe I needed to go to a four-year university in order to become successful in life.

Challenges & Misconceptions

In high school I joined the National Guard and, as a result, I purchased my first car. The car was a 1973 Volkswagen Super Beetle that had rotted away, having been forgotten in a barn for 15 years. My father thought it was a great opportunity to learn the value of work. He and I rebuilt the car over the following two years. I remember spending every waking minute and every spare cent I had on the car. It was my pride and joy in life at that time. I finally finished the car during my senior year of high school. Three months later, I learned one of the hardest lessons of my life when I was involved in an automobile accident.

I thought I was invincible but I wasn’t; my 1973 Volkswagen Super Beetle crashed on the expressway and I was thrown from the car at 85 miles per hour. Miraculously I survived but spent the next month in a coma, the following five months in a hospital, and I had to relearn to walk and speak.

My injuries were only able to hold me back for a few years. The accident inspired me to become an advocate, to speak out, to raise awareness of the dangers of driving distracted. I enrolled in the University of Iowa, first to major in pre-law, then history… Five years and several major changes later, I finished a bachelor’s degree in recreational therapy.

After graduation, like many new graduates, I wanted to move to the big city where the opportunities were said to be endless. Chicago was just far enough to not be close. My first job was for the Illinois Department of Corrections, working with violent offenders. I became quickly burned out.

Many of the people I spoke with agreed that I should follow a natural progression to graduate school. I worked hard to obtain my graduate degree, finishing near the top of my class with a master’s in public administration from Northern Illinois University. From this experience, I took an opportunity to travel to war-torn Iraq to help rebuild the government there. I spent additional time living in Jordan as a Peace Corps volunteer.

Upon my return to America, I worked several white-collar jobs. None of these brought me any fulfillment in life. I often laid in bed and stared at the ceiling, telling myself, “I need to make a change.”

A Choice to Follow a Dream

My father was instrumental in teaching me the importance to technical skills, of the value in understanding how things worked, and how it can bring happiness to a person when they know they can fix something. His lessons really sunk in as we worked, over two years, to restore the 1973 VW Beetle; I value that quality time I shared with my father. Now, at 40, I am a strong advocate for the community college system and the technical skill development opportunities they afford students.

After my realization and some research, the diverse course offerings and small class sizes at The College of DuPage led me to enroll in their automotive technology certificate program. After attending my first class, I knew I had made the right choice. I was confident in my decision to make a change, to pursue a career as an automotive technician.

I am now enrolled and taking courses to receive a bachelor’s degree in automotive technology from Southern Illinois University. Until graduation, I work at the College of DuPage as an automotive tutor where I can give back and help make a difference in the lives of the students there.

After graduating from Southern Illinois University, my plan is to obtain employment at a private auto shop and, down the road, I hope to use my previous education in business to open and manage my own shop. I owe a lot of my future success to the career and technical education programs at The College of DuPage and SIU; the automotive instructors have given me the confidence and skills to make a choice to follow my dream.

Ben Pohl is a “moti-spirational” speaker and an automotive technician. Email him.

EXCERPT: Instructional Coaching & Its Role in Career Development for CTE Teachers

What is an instructional coach?

Quality teacher professional development is essential to the outcome of student achievement. In their careers, teachers must be challenged with new ideas in order to foster a classroom culture of student engagement. The instructional coach is an embedded professional development practitioner who helps teachers attain these lofty educational outcomes (Blackman, 2010).

Instructional coaches share the responsibility of teacher leadership with administrators in the district. Typically, however, coaches are not teacher supervisors and serve a non-evaluative function (Hanover Research, 2015). Coaches employ their pedagogical expertise and the relationships built with teachers to influence change.

CTE and Instructional Coaching

Career and technical education teachers face unique challenges in the secondary educational setting, where many arrive from industry following a change in careeer. Though they may be experts in their subject matter, they often have minimal training in pedagogy (Foster, Hornberger, & Watkins, 2017). New CTE teachers benefit from mentorship and coaching.

New CTE teachers must learn how to instruct in both classroom and lab environments. Training in classroom safety protocols is a priority. They must learn how to implement classroom management and best practices for engaging students. New CTE teachers also will benefit from understanding, more generally, the field of education. They need to be informed about work expectations, academic achievement, special populations and school policy.

In a large school district, as CTE administrators are busy with the day-to-day business of running the department, important communications with teachers can be lost. Instructional coaches provide mentorship to teachers and they also listen to the teachers’ aspirations and concerns. As a result, through listening, the CTE instructional coach can counsel the teacher on their goals.

Monica Amyett is a CTE instructional coach with Fort Worth Independent School District. Email her.

ACTE members can read the full article, “Instructional Coaching & Its Role in Career Development for CTE Teachers,” in the May issue of Techniques. Not a member? Join! ACTE is the largest national education association dedicated to the advancement of education that prepares youth and adults for successful careers.

REFERENCES
Blackman, A. (2010). Coaching as a leadership development tool for teachers. Professional Development in Education (36)3, 421–441.
Foster, J., Hornberger, C., & Watkins, D. (2017). CTE administrative leadership: 10 things to know in your first year. Alexandria, VA: Association for Career and Technical Education.
Hanover Research. (2015). Best practices in instructional coaching. Arlington, VA: Hanover Research.

Cooks and Camo in Bartlett, Illinois

Students enrolled in upper-level culinary classes at Bartlett High School participated in Cooks and Camo, a competition-style event sponsored by the Illinois Army National Guard. Competitors were challenged to create an entree and dessert items inspired by military field rations, known as meals ready to eat (MRE).

“The students did a great job turning MREs in to unique (and tastier) meal creations,” said Kari Laga, a family and consumer sciences teacher at Bartlett High School, in Bartlett, Illinois.

Do you have news?

Member Connected News is a new regular column on PAGES, a Techniques blog. Here is where we highlight the buzz about career and technical education. If you have something (program news, event news, award news or a note of appreciation) to share, we want to hear about it. Fill out the form and you might be featured next.