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ASSOCIATION FOR CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION®

CTE Prepares the Qualified Workforce

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CTE Prepares the Qualified Workforce

CTE is at the forefront of preparing youth and adults to succeed in fast-growing, high-paid jobs in high-growth industries around the country. ACTE has compiled workforce and industry data from several sources to tell the story of how CTE works for preparing the qualified workforce.   

CTE Prepares Students for Highly-paid, Fast-growing, In-demand Jobs
CTE Prepares Students to Fill Talent Shortages
CTE Prepares Students for Industries Important to State, Regional and Local Economies
CTE Prepares Students for the Growing Class of Middle-skills Jobs

 

CTE Prepares Students for Highly-paid, Fast-growing, In-demand Jobs

CTE educates youth and adults for many fast-growing, high-paid jobs in high-growth industries around the country. 

Fastest-growing and highest-paid jobs: According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook, many of the fastest-growing jobs through 2024 will be in CTE fields. Many of the highest-paid jobs are also in fields for which CTE prepares students, including health care, energy, architecture, IT and marketing (learn more about the 16 Career Clusters® and how CTE prepares students for jobs in these fields):

BLS Fastest-growing Occupations BLS Highest-paid Occupations  
Solar Photovoltaic Installers
Orthodontists
Wind Turbine Service Technicians
Anesthesiologists
Home Health Aides
Obstetricians and Gynecologists
Personal Care Aides
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons
Physician Assistants
Surgeons
Nurse Practitioners
Physicians and Surgeons, All Other
Statisticians
Internists, General
Physical Therapist Assistants

Psychiatrists

Software Developers, Applications Family and General Practitioners
Mathematicians
Chief Executives
Bicycle Repairers
Dentists, All Other Specialties
Medical Assistants
Pediatricians, General
Physical Therapist Aides
Nurse Anesthetists
Occupational Therapy Assistants
Dentists, General
Information Security Analysts
Computer and Information Systems Managers
Genetic Counselors
Architectural and Engineering Managers
Operations Research Analysts
Marketing Managers
Forest Fire Inspectors and Prevention Specialists Petroleum Engineers
Health Specialties Teachers, Postsecondary
Airline Pilots, Copilots and Flight Engineers
Derrick Operators, Oil and Gas Prosthodontists

 

Vacancies and job growth by 2020: The Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce has also projected job vacancies and rate of growth for occupations through 2020 in their report, Recovery: Projection of Jobs and Education Requirements Through 2020. Again, CTE prepares students for many of these occupations:  Georgetown CEW Recovery Report Cover
    
Occupation   Vacancies by 2020  Rate of Growth by 2020 
Sales and office support 14,020,000    12 percent
Blue collar 10,230,000 8 percent
Food and personal services 9,110,000 18 percent
Managerial and professional office 8,240,000 24 percent
Education 3,370,000 24 percent
Health care professional and technical 2,830,000 31 percent  
STEM 2,640,000 26 percent
Community services and arts 2,540,000 26 percent
Health care support 1,540,000 26 percent
Social science 270,000 19 percent
 

Learn more about CTE's role in growing the workforce in specific high-demand, high-wage industries such as advanced manufacturing, health care and energy with ACTE's Sector Sheets.

 


CTE Prepares Students to Fill Talent Shortages 

There is much evidence that occupations and industry sectors experiencing talent shortages would benefit from an influx of students prepared by career and technical education to be college- and career-ready.  

Top 10 job shortages: According to the 2016 Manpower Talent Shortage Survey, 45 percent of employers surveyed in the U.S. are having difficulty filling positions. The following are the top 10 positions experiencing a talent shortage in the United States:
Manpower Talent Shortage 2016

 

  1. Skilled Trades Workers
  2. Technicians
  3. Sales Representatives
  4. Production/Machine Operators
  5. Secretaries, PAs, Receptionists, Administrative Assistants and Office Support Staff
  6. Engineers
  7. Management/Executive (Management/Corporate)
  8. Accounting and Finance Staff
  9. Drivers
  10. IT Personnel
 

Job openings: Recent data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey on job openings nationwide also feature the trades, health care and STEM fields, as well as business and hospitality:

Industry Sector  Job Openings Nationwide (June 2017) 
Trade, transportation and utilities 1,027,000
Professional and business services (includes engineering and IT) 1,171,000
Health care and social assistance 1,111,000
Leisure and hospitality 819,000
Manufacturing 419,000

Learn more about how CTE helps fills the skills gap in specific high-demand, high-wage industries such as advanced manufacturing, health care and energy with ACTE's Sector Sheets.

 


CTE Prepares Students for Industries Important to State, Regional and Local Economies

One of the many benefits of CTE programs is that they prepare students not only to contribute to our national economy, but also to contribute to industries vital to state, local and regional economies. 

Share of jobs by state and Career Cluster: According to a report from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, the National Research Center for CTE and the National State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium, the following states will lead the nation in the share of total jobs in each Career Cluster® by 2018:    

 

Career Cluster   States Leading the Nation in Share of Jobs by 2018 
Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources   Wyoming, Idaho, North Dakota, Arkansas, South Dakota
Architecture & Construction   Wyoming, Colorado, Nevada, Louisiana, Alaska
Arts, A/V Technology & Communications   DC, New York, California, Massachusetts, Minnesota
Business Management & Administration   DC, New York, New Jersey, New Hampshire, Connecticut

Education & Training  

Vermont, New York, New Hampshire, Connecticut, New Mexico
Finance   Delaware, South Dakota, Connecticut, New York, Nebraska
Government & Public Administration   DC, Vermont, Idaho, South Dakota, New Jersey
Health Science   Rhode Island, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Massachusetts
Hospitality & Tourism  

Nevada, Hawaii, Montana, South Dakota, New Mexico

Human Services   Vermont, Minnesota, New York, Rhode Island, Alaska
Information Technology   DC, Virginia, Massachusetts, Washington, Maryland
Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security   DC, New York, Florida, New Jersey, Maryland
Manufacturing   Indiana, Wisconsin, South Carolina, Arkansas, Kentucky
Marketing   Florida, Utah, Arizona, Virginia, New Hampshire
STEM   DC, Massachusetts, Michigan, Washington, Maryland
Transportation, Distribution & Logistics   Tennessee, Arkansas, Wyoming, Kentucky, Indiana

ACTE's State Profiles have further information on emerging and important industries in each state--select State Education and Workforce Agenda in the topic list. In addition, educators, guidance professionals and students can use CareerOutlook.US to search for data on occupations by state, including minimum education, growth outlook and entry-level salary.                

 


CTE Prepares Students for the Growing Class of Middle-skills Jobs

Middle-skill jobs, jobs that require education and training beyond high school but less than a bachelor degree, are a significant part of the economy and are expected to grow.

Middle-skill jobs by 2020: According to research from Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, the U.S. will need at least 4.7 million new workers with postsecondary certificates. Of the 55 million job openings projected through 2020, 30 percent will require some college or a two-year associate degree, although this will vary by occupation:

Occupations  Percentage of Middle-skills Jobs by 2020  
Health care support 47 percent
Health care professional and technical 46 percent
Sales and office support 39 percent
Food and personal services 30 percent
Managerial and professional office 26 percent
Blue collar 26 percent
STEM 24 percent
Community services and art 22 percent
Education 15 percent

Earnings by credential level: When earned in CTE fields, subbaccalaureate credentials can lead to higher wages than other credentials. Georgetown University research demonstrates that 43 percent of young workers with licenses and certificates earn more than those with an associate degree; 27 percent of young workers with licenses and certificates earn more than those with a bachelor's degree; and 31 percent of young workers with associate degrees earn more than those with a bachelor's degree. A person with a CTE-related associate degree or credential will earn on average between $4,000 and $19,000 more a year than a person with a humanities associate degree, according to Jacobson and Mokher of the Hudson Institute and CNA.

In addition, research from College Measures is demonstrating, state by state, how students with CTE credentials can out-earn those with higher levels of education in non-CTE fields: College Measures Logo
  • Colorado: Students with Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degrees are earning almost $7,000 more than graduates of bachelor's degree programs across the state, while graduates with the AAS degree earn, on average, about $15,000 more than students with an AA or AS.
  • Tennessee: Average first-year earnings for the state's community college graduates were more than $1,300 higher than graduates of its four-year public schools. Graduates from certificate programs can earn more than $50,000 per year right out of school.
  • Texas: On average, students with two-year technical degrees had first-year median earnings of about $11,000 more than graduates of bachelor's degree programs and about $30,000 more than students with academically oriented two-year degrees. Certificates in health care, construction engineering technology and pipefitting can earn first-year graduates $30,000 more than the Texas-wide median bachelor's degree salary.
  • Virginia: Associate degree holders from Virginia who graduate from an occupational/technical program out-earn other associate degree holders by about $6,000 per year, and even out-earn bachelor degree holders by approximately $2,500.

Learn how many postsecondary certificates will be needed in each state to fulfill workforce needs.

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ACTE is committed to enhancing the job performance and satisfaction of its members; to increasing public awareness and appreciation for career and technical programs; and to assuring growth in local, state and federal funding for these programs by communicating and working with legislators and government leaders.

 

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