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ASSOCIATION FOR CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION

The Association

Frequently Asked Questions

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CTE Questions

What is career and technical education?
What subject areas are covered by career and technical education?
Where is career and technical education offered?
How is it offered?
Is career and technical education only for students who are not college bound?
How many career and technical students are there in the United States?
How many career and technical programs are there in the United States?
Has anyone compiled a list of leading career and technical programs?
How is career and technical education funded?
Is there any proof career and technical education works?
How can I learn more about career and technical education?

Website Questions

How do I log in? Where can I find my ID and password?
What is myACTE? How do I use this feature?
What is RSS? How can I subscribe to ACTEonline via RSS?
Can I subscribe by e-mail to ACTEonline?
What does the "Share" feature do?
What information of yours does ACTEonline collect?
What are "cookies" and how does ACTE use them?
What organization collects the information and who has access to it?
How does ACTE use the information it collects?
How can ACTE members modify their personal information on ACTEonline?
What is the opt-out policy for ACTEonline?
What kinds of security procedures are in place to protect against the loss, misuse or alteration of your information?
How does ACTEonline comply with the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA)?
What you can do to better protect yourself on the Internet


CTE Questions

What is career and technical education?
Career and technical education prepares both youth and adults for a wide range of careers. These careers may require varying levels of education—from high school and postsecondary certificates to two- and four-year college degrees.

What subject areas are covered by career and technical education?
Career and technical education covers a variety of challenging fields in diverse subject areas that are constantly evolving due to the changing global economy. Some of the career areas that students may enter through career and technical education include: Agriculture (farmers, animal scientists, turf grass specialists); Trade and Industrial (automotive technicians, carpenters, electricians); Business and Marketing (entrepreneurs, financial officers, arts/graphics designers); Family and Consumer Sciences (management and life skills, executive chefs, hotel managers); Health Occupations (nurses, physical therapists, biomedical engineers); Public Safety and Security (EMTs, emergency management and response coordinators); and Technology (3D animator, computer engineer, biotechnical engineer).

Where is career and technical education offered?
In middle schools, high schools, two-year community and technical colleges and other postsecondary institutions.

How is it offered?
Public middle schools in the United States typically offer some career and technical education courses, such as family and consumer sciences and technology education (a modular sequence of courses that enables students to explore a variety of technology-based careers). High school programs are offered either within a "comprehensive" high school or in separate "area career and technical schools." In some states, such as Delaware, both academic and technical courses are offered in full-time career and technical high schools. Usually career and technical programs are offered as a sequence of courses that are supplemented by work-based experiences, such as internships or apprenticeships.

Is career and technical education only for students who are not college bound?
No. Career and technical education can provide a foundation of skills that enables high school graduates to be gainfully employed—either full-time or while in college. Nearly two-thirds of all high school graduates of career and technical programs enter some form of postsecondary program. Rigorous academic content tied to technical subject matter ensures that these students will be ready for college. The internships and other cooperative work experiences that are a hallmark of technical education are attractive to all students who want to get a head start on a career, whether that career goal is doctor or nurse, automotive technician or computer scientist. Student career organizations for every subject area also help students acquire the employability and leadership skills that will enable them to succeed in the workplace. Tech Prep programs link high school and community college curricula to help students make a smooth transition to postsecondary education and careers.

How many career and technical students are there in the United States
There are over 15 million secondary and postsecondary career and technical education students in the United States, according to the latest U.S. Department of Education statistics.

How many career and technical programs are there in the United States?
Across the country, career and technical education programs are offered in about 11,000 comprehensive high schools, several hundred career and technical high schools and about 1,400 area career tech centers, which serve students from several "sending" high schools. About 9,400 postsecondary institutions offer technical programs, including community colleges, technical institutes, skill centers and other public and private two- and four-year colleges.

Has anyone compiled a list of leading career and technical programs?
The U.S. Department of Education has named career and technical education programs to its "New American High Schools" list and the Office of Vocational and Adult Education also has recognized programs with awards. ACTE has created the Promising Practices and Programs Web page to highlight career and technical education programs. ACTE and the American Automobile Manufacturers Association sponsor Awards for Excellence in Automotive Training.

How is career and technical education funded?
Programs receive about $1.3 billion annually from the federal government through the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act. That represents about 8-10 percent of budgets for these programs, which receive most of their funding from local and state revenue. Other laws, such as the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the Higher Education Act and the Workforce Investment Act, also fund programs.

Is there any proof career and technical education works?
Yes, according to many studies. Career and technical education graduates are 10-15 percent more likely to be in the labor force, and earn 8-9 percent more than graduates of academic programs, according to a 2001 Russell Sage Foundation study. A ratio of one CTE class for every two academic classes was shown to minimize the risk of students dropping out in a 2005 National Research Center for Career and Technical Education (NRCCTE) report. Career and technical education concentrators take more and higher level math than their general education counterparts, according to a 2002 NCCTE study. ACTE has more evidence that career and technical education works on the CTE Information and Research Web page. 

How can I learn more about career and technical education?
Visit the ACTE publications and Shop ACTE pages on this site, or connect to related organizations through our CTE Links section.


Web Site Questions

How do I log in? Where can I find my ID and password?
You can log in to ACTEonline from the home page or by using the myACTE login boxes throughout the website.

ACTE members, log in with your member ID (found on your ACTE membership card, new member e-mail or Techniques magazine mailing label) and password (the default password is your last name). If you have previously registered to use the site, use the user ID and password you received in ACTE's welcome e-mail.

Click here if you’ve forgotten your password. You can also retrieve your log-in information by contacting ACTE at acte@acteonline.org or at 800-826-9972.

What Is myACTE? How do I use this feature?
myACTE is how ACTE members can access special members-only features of the website.

What is RSS? How can I subscribe to ACTEonline via RSS?
RSS is a tool you can use to keep up with your favorite websites, blogs and more. Use RSS to be notified when ACTEonline content has been updated.

To subscribe to ACTEonline via RSS, you will first need an RSS reader or aggregator. This is a program that pulls together the various Web sites and blogs to which you have subscribed and displays them in one place, so that you can easily see what has changed on all your favorite sites. An easy-to-use, free, web-based RSS reader is Google Reader.

When you see a page on ACTEonline that you want to subscribe to, including the blogs, click “RSS” or the orange RSS icon. With certain web browsers, you will be taken to a neatly formatted page where you can choose your RSS reader. With other web browsers, you will be taken to a page of computer code; in this case, you must manually copy and paste the URL of this page into your RSS reader. Unfortunately, RSS is not compatible with Internet Explorer 6; upgrade to a higher version of Internet Explorer or download a free browser such as Firefox to use RSS.

Can I subscribe by e-mail to ACTEonline?
Yes, you can get updates for the ACTE blogs in your inbox. With RSS, you can also subscribe to updates to any part of the website. 

What does the "Share" feature do?
Clicking the “Share” feature below the "RSS—Print—Email" utility will enable you to share the ACTEonline page you are currently exploring with your Twitter, Facebook, Google and other social networking/bookmarking accounts. We even have specific buttons for Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest, so share away and help us grow!

What information of yours does ACTEonline collect?
Our goal is to become your destination for career and technical education by providing information, services and product offerings that are most relevant to you in the most convenient way. To achieve this goal, ACTEonline collects information about site visitors.

Information collected online is usually defined as being either anonymous or personally identifiable.

Anonymous information refers to data that cannot be tied back to a specific individual. ACTE collects some information each time a visitor comes to the ACTE Web site, so we can improve the overall quality of the visitor's online experience. For example, ACTE collects the visitor's IP address, browser, and platform type (e.g., a Netscape browser on a Windows platform). Gathering this data helps us to learn what browsers we need to support. Other anonymous information helps us determine what sections of ACTEonline are most popular and how many visitors come to our site. You do not have to register with ACTEonline before we can collect this anonymous information.

Personally identifiable information refers to data that tells us specifically who you are (i.e., your name and ZIP code). You are only required to provide such information if you want to take advantage of optional products and services provided through our Web site.

ACTE collects such personally identifiable information from two categories of visitors to our site: Association members and registered non-members. (Some services of ACTEonline, such as discussion boards and e-mail newsletters, are made available to those who choose not to join ACTE. But to take advantage of these services, ACTE requires these visitors to provide a limited amount of personally identifiable information, including name and e-mail address.)

ACTE collects personal information in the following ways from different parts of its Web site:

  • ACTE Membership Application
    When you join ACTE or renew your ACTE membership through our Web site, you are sharing personally identifiable information, including your name and mailing address, with us. ACTE members are given an ACTE membership number, and this member ID and password enables members to take advantage of restricted content and features on ACTEonline.
  • Meeting & Other Registrations
    You may be asked for personal information when registering online for specific services, such as the Annual Convention, to receive an e-mail newsletter, to participate in a listserv or to subscribe to a publication.

The number and variety of useful services on ACTEonline that may require collection of personally identifiable information will continue to grow in the future.

What are "cookies" and how does ACTE use them?
A cookie is a small text file containing a unique identification number that is transferred from a Web site to the hard drive of your computer. This unique number identifies your Web browser—but not you—to ACTE computers whenever you visit ACTEonline. A cookie will not provide personally identifiable information about you, such as your name and address. The use of cookies is now an industry standard, and cookies are currently used on most major Web sites. Most Web browsers are initially set up to accept cookies. If you prefer, you can reset your browser to notify you when you have received a cookie. You can also set your browser to refuse to accept cookies altogether. While ACTE does not require you to use cookies, keep in mind that certain services will not function properly if you set your browser to refuse all cookies.

To help serve you better, ACTE generally uses cookies to identify return visitors. On ACTEonline, cookies primarily allow us to identify ACTE members and registered non-members who are returning to the site, so you will not have to re-enter a user ID and password the next time you visit. As ACTEonline is upgraded, cookies will also let us remember your Web browser so we can provide such benefits as site personalization.

What organization collects the information and who has access to it?
Data collected through ACTE's Web site is generally collected and maintained solely by ACTE. More specifically, when you provide personally identifiable information on ACTEonline to register for a service, buy a product or take advantage of a promotion, that information is collected and maintained solely by ACTE unless specifically stated otherwise at the point of collection. ACTE will inform you at the point of collection if your personal data is being shared with another organization. If you do not want to share your information with that company, you can choose not to use that service.

If you join ACTE or renew your membership through our Web site, you provide personally identifiable information on the membership application. ACTE sells mailing lists (names and mailing addresses) of members to selected third parties. You may opt out of mail-list sales when you complete your online application or anytime during your membership, as described in Item 6 below. ACTE does not sell member e-mail addresses to third parties.

As for anonymous information, we disclose to third-party sponsors/advertisers aggregate statistics (i.e., impressions and click-throughs on a company's advertisement). Also, we may share aggregate website statistics with the media or other third parties. No personally identifiable information is ever disclosed to these sponsors/advertisers or other third parties as part of this process, only information in an aggregate form.

Be aware that ACTE's sponsors, advertisers and third-party content providers have links on our site that take you to other Web sites. For example, when you click on an ad displayed on ACTEonline, you are linked to another site. Please note also that links to other Web sites are provided throughout ACTEonline for users' information and convenience. ACTE hopes that all third parties involved adhere to our policies regarding the privacy of our users. However, ACTE's online privacy policy does not cover third-party data collection practices, and ACTEonline does not assume any responsibility for any actions of third parties.

How does ACTE use the information it collects?
ACTE collects information to provide you with the services you request and to improve our Web site. For example, if you join ACTE or renew your ACTE membership through our Web site, we use the personally identifiable information you provide in the membership application to send you ACTE publications, including e-mail, information about member benefits and special offers, and other information that ACTE believes is relevant and useful to its members.

As mentioned above, ACTE uses the aggregate, anonymous data collected to let our sponsors and advertisers know how many times their ad may have been seen. ACTE also uses this aggregate, anonymous data to perform statistical analyses of the collective characteristics and behavior of our site visitors, measure user interests regarding specific areas of the ACTEonline and analyze how and where best to use our resources. Without such data, we would not know which parts of ACTEonline are the most popular, and we would not be able to change and update the content and services appropriately.

ACTE may be required by law enforcement or judicial authorities to provide information on individual users to the appropriate governmental authorities. In matters involving a danger to personal or public safety, ACTE may voluntarily provide information to appropriate governmental authorities.

How can ACTE members modify their personal information on ACTEonline?
The ACTE Web site currently has no means by which ACTE members can fully change or modify information previously provided. Only limited changes can be made in the context of specific services and benefits, such as changing your e-mail address for an e-mail newsletter. Other changes and modifications can be submitted by postal mail, e-mail, telephone or fax.

  • E-mail: acte@acteonline.org
  • Telephone: 703-683-3111 or 800-826-9972
  • Fax: 703-683-7424
  • Postal address: ACTE, 1410 King Street, Alexandria, Virginia, 22314, ATTN: Membership Department

What is the opt-out policy for ACTEonline?
ACTE provides members the opportunity to opt out of receiving communications from us and our partners. If you no longer wish to receive specific communications or services, please contact us using the means described above.

In the case of opting out of ACTE discussion lists and e-mail newsletters, automatic opt-out instructions may be included within each e-mail.

What kinds of security procedures are in place to protect against the loss, misuse or alteration of your information?
ACTEonline has security measures, such as firewalls, in place to attempt to protect against the loss, misuse and alteration of your user data under our control. ACTE has implemented strict rules for employees who have access either to the databases that store user information or to the servers that host our services. While we cannot guarantee that loss, misuse or alteration to data will not occur, we take many precautions to prevent such unfortunate occurrences. Any other particularly sensitive information collected by a commerce transaction, such as your credit card number, is encrypted prior to transmission.

You are ultimately responsible for the security of your ACTE member ID number and password. You may not share your ACTE member ID number and password with colleagues or friends so they can access content or features on ACTEonline that are restricted to ACTE members only. You should log out of your browser at the end of each computer session to ensure that others cannot access your personal information and correspondence, especially if you share a computer with someone else or are using a computer in a public place like a library or Internet cafe.

How does ACTEonline comply with the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA)?
This site makes bulletin boards and discussion lists available to its members. Any information that is disclosed in these areas becomes public information, and you should exercise caution when deciding to disclose your personal information. Although users may post messages that will appear on the message boards anonymously, ACTE does retain a record of who posts all notes.

Tell your children, "Never talk to strangers!" While ACTEonline does not include material directed to children, it's a good rule of thumb to teach children that they should not reveal their names or other personal information to anyone they encounter on the Internet. They should also be instructed not to fill out any forms or register at any Web site without your knowledge and consent.

What you can do to better protect yourself on the Internet
Know the risks. The opportunity to network in an online community (chat room, forum, message board, etc.) is one of the best things about the Internet, but you should always be careful about disclosing personal information, such as an actual name, member name, e-mail address and so on. This information may be collected and used by others within the online community to send unsolicited e-mail messages outside ACTEonline. Some of the messages you receive may be useful to you, but some may not.

Educate yourself. Search the Web for as much information as you can about how to protect your privacy. Look for a privacy policy on the Web sites you visit. A good place to start is TRUSTe, an independent, non-profit organization with a mission to build trust and confidence in the Internet. The Federal Trade Commission has a Web site with useful information on being a savvy Internet user, along with other privacy initiatives. Additional privacy resources can be found by clicking on any of the following links:

Questions? Contact ACTE Communications.

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Data and Research Task Force

The mission of the Data and Research Task Force is to identify priorities and provide support that will position ACTE as the leader related to quality career and technical education data and research.

Energy Sustainability Task Force

The mission for the Energy Sustainability Task Force is to develop a plan outlining strategies for ACTE to position career and technical education as a leader in the energy sustainability arena.

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Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Natural Gas Technology Online Seminar

Thursday, November 06, 2014

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