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ASSOCIATION FOR CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION®

Policy and Advocacy

Elementary and Secondary Education Act

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Key Information:

  • The Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) was last reauthorized as the No Child Left Behind Act in 2002 as Public Law 107-110.
  • It was originally scheduled for reauthorization in 2007, but has been delayed numerous times (the program continues under the prior law with congressional funding).
  • The latest updates can be found on the ESEA section of the CTE Policy Watch blog.

Reauthorization:
ACTE Positions & Statements Other Groups' Positions

Background:

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act was originally passed 1965. Recent reauthorizations include the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act of 1981 and Improving America’s Schools Act of 1994. No Child Left Behind, the current reauthorization, passed in 2002. This Act, which funds primary and secondary education, made significant changes in education policy to close the achievement gap with accountability, flexibility, and choice, so that “no child is left behind.” Key components of the law include increased accountability for states, school districts, and schools; teacher quality provisions; greater choice for parents and students, particularly those attending low-performing schools; more flexibility for states and local educational agencies in the use of federal education dollars; and a stronger emphasis on what has been proven to work through scientifically based research. The titles of the Act include:

Title I—Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged
Title II—Preparing, Training and Recruiting High Quality Teachers and Principals
Title III—Language Instruction of Limited English Proficient and Immigrant Students
Title IV—21st Century Schools
Title V—Promoting Informed Parental Choice and Innovative Programs
Title VI—Flexibility and Accountability
Title VII—Indian, Native Hawaiian and Alaska Native Education
Title VIII—Impact Aid Program
Title IX—General Provisions

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act is also tied in closely with Perkins. Specifically, under Perkins, the success of CTE programs is determined by several pieces of the No Child Left Behind adequate yearly progress system. Specific indicators include student attainment of challenging academic content standards and student academic achievement standards, and student graduation rates.

In the years since the Elementary and Secondary Education Act came due for reauthorization, congressional gridlock has prevented Congress from updating the antiquated law. In order to avoid states and schools from falling victim to the unachievable ideals of AYP, the Obama Administration bypassed Congress to relieve states from current ESEA accountability standards. In September 2011, the Department of Education invited states to apply for a waiver of flexibility from certain provisions in ESEA, including AYP. In exchange, states had to submit a rigorous and comprehensive state-developed plan to improve education outcomes for all students, close achievement gaps, increase equity and improve the quality of instruction. Since that time, almost all states have been involved in the waiver process, and each is operating under different plans and parameters.

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External Links

Techniques Advert Events Partners Countdown Federal Government  U.S. Department of Education  Office of Vocational and Adult Education  Institute of Education Sciences  National Center for Education Statistics  U.S. Department of Labor  Bureau of Labor Statistics  U.S. Department of Agriculture  U.S. House of Representatives  U.S. Senate  The Library of Congress's Thomas page  Government Accountability Office  The White House  Office of Management and Budget  Research  ACTE's CTE Research and Info Center  National Assessment of Vocational Education  National Research and Dissemination Centers for Career and Technical Education  MDRC  RAND Corporation  National Associations and Organizations  American Association of Community Colleges  American Youth Policy Forum  Center for Budget and Policy Priorities  Center for Law and Social Policy  Committee for Education Funding  Council of Chief State School Officers  Jobs for the Future  Manufacturing Skill Standards Council  National Alliance for Partnerships in Equity  National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium  National Association of Workforce Boards  National Center on Education and the Economy  National Council of State Directors of Community Colleges  National Dropout Prevention Centers  National Governors’ Association  National Youth Employment Coalition  Southern Regional Education Board  States' Career Clusters Initiative  Workforce Alliance 

Social Media Advocacy

Sharing your thoughts with your Senators or Representative on a routine basis will keep CTE in the front of their minds. By using advocacy as a tool, we can influence Congress to continue and improve successful programs like Perkins, ESEA and the Workforce Investment Act. Social media advocacy is one of the quickest and simplest ways to spread the CTE message to your Members of Congress. You can share about the benefits of your CTE program, activities your students are involved in, or your thoughts on key policy issues. You can even post pictures to illustrate your points.

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Sunday, July 31, 2016

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